Wednesday, July 19, 2017

20/07/2017: Innovation never sleeps: The power of C-Dome technology

by Nina Hanssen, Commercial Director of Aqua Farming Solutions B.V., a subsidiary of H2O Technics B.V., The Netherlands

As the key industry that needs to ensure the ever-growing world population will have sufficient food on the table in the future, the aquaculture industry has a huge burden upon its shoulders

 

Image credit: Aqua Farming Solutions B.V.

Fish consumption is growing rapidly, not only due to better availability, but also since consumers are becoming more and more aware of the health advantages of seafood. There is no reason to believe that this will change, but fish farmers all over the world are preparing effectively for the necessary adjustments.

Although parts of the industry might still have a long way to go before it is sustainable in the eyes of a fairly big part of the consumer market, there is no doubt that within the industry itself, there is a fast-growing awareness of the importance of sustainable and environmentally friendly farming, as well as increased efforts to meet the requirements of the consumers.

Today’s aquaculture industry is young, and it stands to reason that it still has a few issues that need better solutions, including the continuous problems caused by parasites which not only has an impact on wild fish like trout and salmon, it also disaffects public opinion towards farmed fish around the world.

A vast amount of money is being spent globally every year to continue to improve all aspects of aquaculture, and the will to find solutions to problems, is enormous, giving credit to the entire industry as a whole as the efforts and self-appointed targets are consequently raised. For example, new techniques and ideas are invented, developed and tested, and existing techniques improved where possible.

Finding one method which can solve all issues is the ultimate goal for everyone involved in aquaculture, and as the whole industry goes through a continuous development and is strong enough to face any new challenges, there is no doubt that aquaculture will sooner or later succeed in finding that one method. Indeed, we might be closer than we realise.

A new technology, a natural solution
The technologies of H2O Technics B.V. was developed by a team of Dutch inventors more than 12 years ago, and although it was based on an already known technology, the Dutch inventors were able to reinvent and customise the technology for various purposes related to water treatments.

Similar technology is used in several areas of everyday life; pregnancy ultrasound, echo sounding to determine depth of water, automatic door openers, processing of liquids and paper, cleaning of medical equipment; the list is endless. The C-Dome has been developed by Aqua Farming Solutions, for and together with the aquafarming industry, and it is equipped with four resonators mounted on the inside, three aiming sideways and one aiming straight down.

The C-Dome is preferably placed in, or close to the middle of, the fish cage and each resonator has a reach of approximately 50 meters in salt water. Together with the electronics box mounted on the frame, each resonator is able to create non-inertial Nano-cavitation: The microscopic vibrations caused by the resonators, change the potential energy stored within the mass of water into kinetic energy, creating microscopic voids in the water which implode due to the pressure changes, hereby creating microscopic water jets; Nano-cavitation.

Our Nano-cavitation is unique within water treatment, and as mentioned earlier, is the result of more than 12 years of reinventing the ultrasound technology. It has been in use for several years already in the Netherlands, and together with the multiple installations in fish cages in several countries, the technology has proven its worth.

The importance of keeping the nets used in the fish cages clean and free of algae, is probably something the average consumer hasn’t really thought of, but for the farmer, it is of utmost importance. Bio-fouling might not seem to be a big issue, but too much of it can lead to far bigger problems; the nets may become too heavy, followed by the risks of tearing which again may give the fish the opportunity to escape, with all the consequences that this entails.

The accumulation of fouling organisms on the nets may lead to hydroids settling down, in addition to being a perfect hiding place for various ectoparasites like sea lice and the amoeba Neoparamoeba perurans; the last one causing the amoebic gill disease in farmed fish. There are several ways of cleaning the nets, and pretty much all of them include handling the fish one way or the other, which by multiple treatments may have impact on the skin and the mucus layer.

High pressure and mechanical net cleaning may also lead to damages on the net itself, increasing the risk of escapes, as well as release of various organisms hiding in the fouling which may even expand the problem further with regards to parasites.


Read the full article, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Tyson company profile




Tyson Animal Nutrition Group is a leading producer of 100 percent chicken-based protein meals, chicken fats and wet pet ingredients.

Their experience, knowledge, commitment to quality and strong customer relationships have made them one of the most respected names in animal nutrition.

Tyson's vertically-integrated structure gives them control over all stages of the life cycle of their chickens, from hatching-egg production to distributing the finished product.

And because all of their raw materials come from USDA-inspected processing plants, their ingredients are consistent, traceable and to your specifications.

Their sales and support Team Members welcome the opportunity to partner with you and meet your needs for high-quality ingredients.

Learn more about our products or speak to one of our sales managers today.

Visit the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

19/07/2017: Nutriad sponsors major aquaculture events in Asia

Multinational feed additives producer Nutriad continues to show its leadership role in the aquaculture industry as it announced its sponsorship of three major events in the coming months

- Asian Pacific Aquaculture (APA) 2017
- The Aquaculture Roundtable Series (TARS) 2017
- Diseases in Asian Aquaculture (DAA)

 With one mayor event, each month in the coming period, Nutriad is investing in showcasing its products and services across the Asian region. 


 
Oyster Ranch
Image credit: Michael Davis-Burchat
“Being close to our customers and interacting with leading experts in key aquaculture markets is part of our strategy as we are increasing our footprint in the industry. It promises to be a busy summer,” says Dr Peter Coutteau, Business Unit Director Aquaculture for Nutriad.

“Our sponsorships focus on supporting the aquaculture sector in general, and more specifically South East Asia, to help producers deal with the key challenge of reducing the impact of diseases and parasites on productivity.”

Asian Pacific Aquaculture (APA) 2017, the major aquaculture exhibition in South East Asia organised by the World Aquaculture Society, takes place Kuala Lumpur from 24th to 27th of July. Nutriad sponsors the scientific session entitled “Functional Feeds for Disease Prevention.”

At this session, chaired by Dr Peter Coutteau and Professor Dr Rossita Shapawisurely, speakers from the industry as well as the academic sector will treat some hot topics related to Health management and farm practices in Thailand, functional feed additives to prevent fish and shrimp diseases, effects of soybean meal on tissue cholesterol status and molting relative gene expression in white shrimp as well as effects of garlic against Aeromonas hydrophila in Nile Tilapia.

“We carefully selected the speakers and topics for this Nutriad sponsored session, allowing our partners and customers in APAC to learn about current market developments and new findings regarding health management,” stated Allen Wu, Regional Manager Aquaculture APAC and Board Director of World Aquaculture Society – Asian Pacific Chapter.

Nutriad will also organize a gala diner upon invitation. The Aquaculture Roundtable Series (TARS) 2017 is built around central them of Finfish Aquaculture: Strategies for Growth. This is the second time this series of roundtables, initiated in 2011, is focusing on the finfish aquaculture industry. The meetings will take place in Bali, Indonesia from August 16-17 will explore the growth potential of Asia’s finfish aquaculture industry.

Nutriad proudly has been sponsoring TARS since 2012. This year, the company sponsors Professor Dr Francisco E. Montero from the University of Valencia, Spain to speak on Parasites Prevention in Fish Farming.

“Parasite control is one of the key issues in health management of all commercial species of fish, including salmon, tilapia and marine fish. However, there is a general lack of basic knowledge on fish parasites in the aquaculture industry, particularly in Asia,” according to Dr Maria Mercè Isern Subich DVM, Nutriad’s Business Development Manager Aquaculture Health.

“Professor Montero, involved in research on fish parasitology since 2001, will share his views on the life cycle and mode of action of different species of fish parasites relevant for aquaculture, and illustrate current practices and challenges to prevent and/or treat parasites in fish farms in Europe.”

The 10th Diseases in Asian Aquaculture (DAA) conference will be organized by the Fish Health Section of the Asian Fisheries Society (FHS-AFS) in Bali, Indonesia from Aug 28 to Sept 1. FHS-AFS was founded in 1989 in Malaysia and made a tradition of this triennial scientific symposium to update members and aqua health professionals on topics related to aquatic animal health in Asian aquaculture.

DAA10 central theme will be “Enhancing Aquatic Health Research and Services through Public-Private Sector Partnerships” and anticipates the attendance of 500 delegates from 30-40 countries. Nutriad is a silver sponsor at DAA10 and Dr Maria Mercè Isern Subich DVM will give an overview of recent trial results obtained with Nutriad’s health program in lab and field trials during an oral presentation entitled “Functional feed additives as prevention of parasitic disease in fish”.

Nutriad delivers products and services to over 80 countries through a network of own sales offices and distributors. Supported by four application laboratories and five manufacturing facilities on three continents.


Visit the Nutriad website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

19/07/2017: Global aquaculture CEOs and the best aquaculture start-ups come together to talk innovation

CEOs from the world’s leading aquaculture companies will join with the most exciting novel technology companies in the industry to talk about innovation in farm management, nutrition and health this September in London
 

The opening of this inaugural conference will see twelve of the most exciting emerging companies in the aquaculture industry present their novel technologies to investors; all competing for new business partners from the audience and the prestigious Award for Innovation.

The main session is dedicated to innovation-focused presentations and panel discussions from influential industry members, including:
• The Need for and the Value of Innovation to the Aquaculture Industry: Jason Clay, World Wildlife Fund
• What lessons can Aqua learn from Traditional Animal Health Experience?: Alejandro Bernal, Zoetis
• The Investment View on Aquaculture and Advice for Start-Ups: Matthias Hofer, Stonehaven Consulting

Across the Animal Health Innovation portfolio 75 percent of the attendees are Director level and above; and of the 100-strong audience at Aquaculture Innovation Summit, over one third of these attendees will be made-up of emerging aquaculture companies.

Matthias Hofer, Senior Partner, Stonehaven Consulting said, “I’m really excited about the event. Aquaculture is a young industry if compared to farming land based animals. As an industry, it is still forming with challenges emerging more frequently. Innovation will help addressing these challenges and will help to advance the industry even further. This summit will be a great opportunity to see some of the industry’s most impressive emerging companies and to discuss new ways to drive progress in aquaculture.”

The Aquaculture Innovation Summit will take place from 28-29 September 2017 at the Millennium Gloucester Hotel in London, UK.
The lower Early Bird rate expires this Friday. Reduced rates are also available for emerging companies and include a pre-conference networking afternoon for business partnering. Conference pass fees will apply. 

Contact Jessica Parry at jp@kisacoresearch.com for inquiries.

Complete event information is available online, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

19/07/2017: Sustainable farming of lobsters: A dream soon to become a reality?

by Associate Professor Greg Smith, University of Tasmania, Director of the ARC Research Hub for Commercial Development of Rock Lobster Culture Systems at the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS)

Spiny lobsters, also known as rock lobsters in Australia and New Zealand, are one of the few high value marine species that are yet to be cultured in commercial hatcheries
The appeal of culturing spiny lobsters is due to favourable market attributes including the fresh product’s high value in the Asian market, increasing product demand and the static nature of current wild fishery.
 

Image credit: IMAS

Research into the biology of spiny lobsters is not new, with initial propagation studies undertaken in Japan in the 1800s. The larval phase of up to seven species was completed in Japanese laboratories between 1960 and 2000.

Spiny lobster propagation research has since been undertaken in a number of countries including Australia, New Zealand, Vietnam, India, America, Mexico and England. For the last two decades, larval propagation research has been focused in Australia and in recent years at the University of Tasmania’s Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS), in Hobart.

Australian lobster research has had long-term government support through the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation (FRDC), the Tasmanian Government, the Australian Research Council (ARC) and private equity.

The current research program at IMAS focuses on commercialisation of the hatchery technology supported by an ARC grant of US$5 million through the Industrial Transformation Research Program.

The ARC funding targets collaborative research between industry partners and Australia’s best researchers. The ARC Research Hub for Commercial Development of Spiny Lobster Culture Systems is a collaboration with the University of Tasmania, University of Auckland (New Zealand), University of the Sunshine Coast, and Australian industry partner Plastic Fabrications Group.

The research programme is supported by the Tasmanian Government through the Sustainable Marine Research Collaboration Agreement. While there have been challenges to overcome in the hatchery production of seed stock, the grow out sector has been established since the 1990s, primarily in Vietnam, with some recent activity in other countries in the region including Indonesia.

Despite the larval phase of many species of spiny lobster being completed in research laboratories, until recently, there has been a failure to translate the small-scale research success into commercial processes.

As a result of there being no hatchery production of spiny lobsters seed stock, aquaculture is based on the collection of wild seed stock. The larval cycle of spiny lobsters is protracted; typically females mate in inshore waters and carry a fertilised bundle of eggs externally attached under their tail.

While attached to the female the eggs develop for a period of between weeks and months, depending on the species, and then hatch as underdeveloped larvae (phyllosoma). To sustain a static population, spiny lobsters focus their reproductive energy in the investment of large numbers of offspring.

In the wild, each breeding female will hatch millions of phyllosoma, but with a long larval duration, small numbers survive to reach juvenile and later adult stages. Phyllosoma reside within the water column and are transported into the open ocean by currents and eddies, they have very limited swimming ability.

In offshore waters, and often at depth, the phyllosoma will undertake the complex larval development phase, including up to 24 individual moult events. The larval duration can be protracted and may last anywhere between months to years, dependent on a number of factors including the species, availability of feed and environmental conditions.

At the completion of the phyllosoma phase of development spiny lobsters undergo an extreme metamorphosis event, transforming from a two-dimensional clear disc shaped phyllosoma into a three-dimensional shaped puerulus.

This puerulus is a non-feeding nektonic stage; the primary purpose of this life-phase is to swim from the offshore waters to inshore reef systems or other suitable benthic habitats to settle upon. This migration from oceanic waters to reef habitats during the puerulus phase is often a distance of hundreds of kilometres.

When they have reached a suitable habitat puerulus will undergo a final larval moult transforming into the benthic juvenile phase and assume typical lobster morphology. Currently, aquaculture farmers will target both of these latter stages of development to enable the stocking of their sea cages.

Puerulus are caught at night in inshore bays using lights for attraction into fine mesh nets, or alternatively harvested from artificial settlement structures, such as bundles of mesh or used cement bags.

The juvenile development phase is also targeted using poles with small holes drilled in them set near the shoreline; this structure provides a habitat for juvenile lobsters to shelter in and thus a means of collection for farmers. The preferred culture species targeted in Vietnam is Panulirus ornatus, also known as the tropical, ornate or painted lobster, however obtaining this species from local waters can be difficult, with other less commercially desirable species also being collected and cultured.

There are a number of issues with the reliance on collection of seed stock from the wild, including sustainability, reliability of supply, biosecurity and the inability to obtain genetic improvement of cultured stocks.

The long and complex lifecycle of spiny lobsters has provided challenges for the establishment of a sustainable commercial aquaculture industry. The collaboration between expert scientists and industry in the ARC Research Hub for Commercial Development of Spiny Lobster Culture Systems has provided the platform for innovative research to bring the dream of sustainable farming of lobsters a step closer.


Read the full article, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Reed Mariculture company profile



Reed Mariculture is the world's largest producer of marine microalgae concentrates for larval fish, bivalves, crustaceans and other filter feeders.

Their Instant Algae® larviculture feeds are used by over 500 hatcheries, universities, and marine ornamental operations in more than 80 countries around the world.

They also produce and distribute pathogen and ciliate free rotifers,Parvocalanus copepods, and Otohime and TDO weaning feeds.


Reed Mariculture's Instant Algae products are closer to nature than any other feed on the market. They produce whole-cell, whole-food microalgae feeds and enrichments from marine algae using proprietary processes.


Their
 products provide fish, bivalve and shrimp hatcheries with clean, convenient, long shelf-life feeds that are superior choices to replace or supplement live microalgae.

Their feeds ensure stable and rapidly-reproducing rotifer populations with superior rich nutritional value.


Visit the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

18/07/2017: Royal honour for aquaculture innovation, Norway

Karsten Glomset is well-known to all who have worked with oxygenation in aquaculture

Recently, he received the King’s Medal of Merit for his pioneering work. His employer through many years, AGA AS, is participating in the Aqua Nor seminar, ‘Modern aquaculture – more than salmon’, and their presentation is built on Mr Glomset’s pioneering work through 30 years. 


 
Karsten Glomset receives the King’s Medal of Merit
Image credit: AquaNor
A humble recipient of honour
AGA is a well-known and large gas company and among the market leaders in oxygenation in Norway and Northern Europe. The group is very pleased with Mr Glomset’s role in positioning the company in the aquaculture industry – but Mr Glomset returns the compliment, “I have no idea why just I am honoured with this medal. What we have done here is a team effort and an excellent example of cooperation across various divisions in the company,” he said in a recent interview.

The past is important to the future

Although both AGA and the rest of the industry has developed new technology continuously through the years, Mr Glomset’s contributions have been indispensable to all who have continued his work. He has patented several solutions, which have led to a situation where we can now raise robust salmon in healthy environments of growth.

Already in the 1980s Mr Glomset laid the foundation for oxygenation which made it possible to improve production of smolt in close tanks on land and maintain an oxygen-rich environment during operations that may be stressful to the fish. In a ceremony at AGA’s plant in Ålesund, Mr Glomset was honoured for his work with one of Norway’s highest honours, the King’s Medal of Merit.

AGA participates in a seminar at Aqua Nor
In the seminar «Modern aquaculture – more than salmon», which is organised by the Nor-Fishing Foundation and Innovation Norway, AGA will bring over 30 years of experience with oxygenation to the audience as a backdrop for modern innovation and the latest expertise. AGA’s presentation will focus on future sustainable oxygenation for the aquaculture industry.

Show up in Hall A4 at 14:00 hrs on Tuesday 15th of August 2017 and be part of this exciting seminar.

A detailed programme will be announced soon.

Contact Erik Hempel for more information:
Erik Hempel Director of Communications
The Nor-Fishing Foundation
+ 47 908 41 124
erik.hempel@hempelco.com


Visit the AquaNor website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Monday, July 17, 2017

18/07/2017: Lobster expert topic

by Zasha Whiteway-Wilkinson, International Aquafeed magazine

The spiny lobster, or alternatively known as the rock lobster or crayfish, are a family of around 60 species of achelate crustaceans, in the Decapoda Reptantia within the class Malacostraca
 


Although they superficially resemble true lobsters in terms of shape and having a hard carapace and exoskeleton, the groups are not closely related. Spiny lobsters can be identified by their long, thick spiny antennae, by their lack of claws on the first four pairs of walking legs (although the females of most species have a small claw on their fifth pair) and by a specialised larval phase called phyllosoma.

The species typically have a slightly compressed carapace, lacking any lateral ridges. Their antennae lack a scaphocerite, the flattened exopod of the antenna. This is fused to the epistome (a plate between the labrum and the basis of the atenna). The flagellum, at the top of the antenna, is stout, tapering, and very long. The ambulatory legs (pereopods) end in claws (chelae).

The lobsters are found in almost all warm seas, including the Caribbean and the Mediterranean, although they are particularly common in Australasia. They tend to live in crevices of rocks and coral reefs, only occasionally venturing out at night to eat.

Sometimes they migrate in very large groups in long files across the ocean floor, the lines could be up to 50 lobsters long. The spiny lobsters navigate using the smell and taste of natural substances in the water that can change in different areas of the ocean.

It was also recently discovered that spiny lobsters could navigate by detecting the Earth’s magnetic field. They contact each other using their long antennae and deter potential predators also using their antennae by rubbing it against a smooth part of their exoskeleton, creating a loud screech.

This noise is produced by frictional vibrations – sticking and slipping, similar to rubber materials sliding against hard surfaces, while a number of insects use frictional vibration mechanisms to generate sound, this particular acoustic mechanism is unique in the animal kingdom.

Notably, this system does not rely on the hardness of the exoskeleton, meaning that they can continue to produce deterrent noises even in the period following a moult when they are at their most vulnerable.


Read the three page section on Lobsters in International Aquafeed's July edition, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Romer Labs company profile




Founded in Washington, MO, in 1982, over the years Romer Labs became a leading provider of diagnostic solutions for the agricultural, food and feed industry.

Today, Romer Labs offers a broad range of innovative diagnostic solutions covering mycotoxins, food pathogens, food allergens, gluten, GMO, veterinary drug residues, and other food contaminants.

Their portfolio includes:

ELISA test kits - AgraQuant®
Lateral flow devices - AgraStrip® and RapidChek®
Fluorometric tests - FluoroQuant®
Enzymatic tests - EnzymeFast®
Reference materials - Biopure™
Cleanup Columns - MycoSep®, MultiSep®, MycoSpin®, StarLine™
Sampling mills

Furthermore, they operate four accredited, full-service laboratories in Austria, UK, US and Singapore.

Using cutting-edge technology in the fields of chromatography and immunological analysis, their labs offer services for the analysis of mycotoxins, food allergens, meat speciation, VDR and GMO.

Romer Labs is at the forefront of diagnostic technology and they are constantly expanding their product and service portfolio to meet your continuously evolving demands.

The key objective at Romer Labs is to provide scientifically sound, high-quality products and an exceptional service, in line with their mission – Making the World’s Food Safer®.

Would you like to join them in making a mark for a better world?

Visit  the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

17/07/2017: GLOBALG.A.P. farm assurers from Bayer

GLOBALG.A.P. now has six new Farm Assurers from Bayer AG

Today GLOBALG.A.P. announced that they have welcomed Beatriz Arrieta from Colombia, Jianping An from China, Juan Carlos González from Guatemala, Arturo Ledesma from Mexico, and Camilo Osorio and José Fabio Morera from Costa Rica to our Farm Assurers Network. 


 
Image credit: Tristan Schmurr on Flickr
Bayer AG and GLOBALG.A.P. have been collaborating for several years to create awareness of the importance of sustainable solutions in agriculture, ensure the promotion and implementation of good agricultural practices for food security, and help smallholders to achieve certification.

As part of this collaboration, Bayer is promoting the GLOBALG.A.P. scheme as a reference for sustainable agriculture in several of its projects. For this purpose, Bayer has begun certifying its employees as Farm Assurers so they become internal GLOBALG.A.P. experts.

Through personalised training and advice from the internal Farm Assurers, Bayer will be able to guarantee that good agricultural practices are correctly implemented.

 Bayer employees can be presented as experts to guide their partners through the certification process of their farmers. The presence of Farm Assurers at Bayer is not only a guarantee of correct implementation of good agricultural practices, but also an opportunity to spread and advocate the standard to Bayer’s network of partners.

More Bayer employees will be certified in the following months.

Visit the GLOBALG.A.P. website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Sunday, July 16, 2017

17/07/2017: The use of taurine in fishfeeds: With Dr Guillaume Salze, PhD



After many years of research, the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) has now approved the use of taurine in fish feeds. Taurine is an organic compound that is widely distributed in animal tissues.

It is a major constituent of bile and can be found in the large intestine, accounting for up to 0.1 percent of total human body weight. The chemical compound is named after the Latin Taurus, meaning bull or ox, as it was first isolated from ox bile in 1827 by German scientists Friedrich Tiedemann and Leopold Gmelin.

Dr Salze has been a research associate at Auburn University, Alabama since September 2012 having previously been a postdoctoral fellow ay the University of Guelph from July 2009. He has written or been involved in over 20 publications in the Aquaculture industry.

He explained that, “The Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO)’s members include both public officials and industry partners. One of their roles is to provide guidelines for animal feeds and establish ingredient definitions. This new announcement is to inform the public that AAFCO amended its definition of crystal taurine – that is the species and limitations within which it can be used as a feed ingredient. The previous definition included cats, dogs, and chicken. The amended definition now includes all species and all life stages of fish.”

What is the relevance of taurine to fish feed?

Dr Salze expands, “Taurine is found ubiquitously in all animals – it is actually one of the predominant amino acid in animal tissues. For a long time, taurine was thought to be a non-essential nutrient – that is a substance that the body can make on its own using other molecules, and therefore is not required in the diet. For over a decade, a number of research groups have looked at the role of taurine in fish. As it turns out, taurine is an essential nutrient for many fish species, so it must be found in their food. If taurine is not present in the food, the fish do not eat or grow well, are more susceptible to diseases, and have increased mortality. So taurine is extremely important in these species.”

Describing how this amendment will benefit both the fish stock and producers, Dr Salze reinforced that it will have a far-reaching impact. He remarked that since taurine is found in all animal tissues, animal-based ingredients typically contain significant levels of taurine (provided it is not lost during ingredient processing).

As a result, fishmeal contains taurine, usually around 0.5-0.7 percent. In contrast, plants do not contain taurine, so plant-based ingredients do not bring any taurine to the feed. As fish nutritionists improve feed formulations to increase plant-based proteins at the expense of animal-based proteins, diets contain lowered levels of taurine. This can be to the extent that for some species like Florida pompano, taurine is actually the first-limiting amino acid in soy-based diets, not methionine!

Dr Salze observed that, “Before the AAFCO amended its taurine definition, taurine had to be supplied through other animal ingredients, such as fishmeal, fish solubles, krill or squid meal, poultry-by product meal, etc. These ingredients are expensive, and increase feed costs. Also, ingredients like fishmeal rely greatly on dedicated wild fisheries. Now that the definition has been officially amended, feed can be formulated with lower levels of animal-based ingredients, because taurine can be included separately. Its inclusion is conducive to the further reduction of expensive animal protein and in turn increasing plant proteins, thereby contributing to reducing feed costs while also reducing pressures on wild fisheries.”

Dr Salze highlighted that the other benefit to the American fish feed industry includes exportation to international markets. He reiterated that before the amendment of AAFCO’s definition, the United States was the only country where taurine was not approved for use in fish feed, whilst the European Union, New Zealand, China, Japan, Canada, Chile (to name a few), all have regulations in place allowing for taurine use.

He concluded that, “The American producers found themselves in a difficult situation because their formulations could meet the taurine requirement through higher levels of fishmeal. In that case, the feeds were not competitive with those from other countries, since they were able to include taurine and reduce fishmeal inclusion. Buyers were aware of the importance of taurine, and were quite skeptical of un-supplemented feeds.”

Alternatively, they would include taurine but then were somewhat at odds with FDA’s regulation and could be barred from accessing international markets altogether. He noted that, “Clearly, this was not a good situation, and now the gap is filled.”

He clarified that, “To be clear, crystal taurine is artificially synthesised through chemical reactions. Producing taurine by extraction and purification from animal tissues is simply not feasible: the efficiencies are low, cost is very high, and there are not enough raw materials available to satisfy global demand. On the other hand, chemical synthesis is relatively simple (compared to that of some other amino acids), inexpensive, and the purity of the resulting product is very high (>98%). Very importantly, the crystal taurine has the exact same chemical structure as the taurine found in animal tissue. There is no difference whatsoever. Whoever ingests it will therefore use it just as the natural taurine would be.”


Read the full article, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

International Protein LLC company profile



International Protein LLC is a worldwide importer/exporter and manufacturer of animal feed industry.

Their product line includes a wide variety of feed additives, ingredients, proteins, and raw materials for the poultry, swine, aquaculture and pet industry.

Their main office is located in New Jersey, where they handle trading, logistics, product marketing, and new business development.

Visit the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Thursday, July 13, 2017

14/07/2017: Spanish and Portuguese experts collaborate to optimise the production and exploitation of microalgae

Spanish and Portuguese experts will collaborate in the ALGARED+ project (“Cross-Border network for the development of innovative products with microalgae”), which means to promote the study and technological development in the area of microalgae biotechnology and their exploitation in different fields such as health, cosmetics and aquaculture

 
Image credit: ctaqua
The ALGARED+ project is framed within the INTERREG V-A cross-Border cooperation Programme between Spain and Portugal (POCTEP) and will be implemented by a consortium comprised of nine institutions, including universities, research centres, public and private enterprises in the areas of aquaculture, biomedicine and microalgae production in the regions of the Algarve and Alentejo in Portugal, and Andalusia in Spain.

This network seeks to strengthen the cross-border R+D+i system in an emerging sector with great potential for microalgal biotechnology. Simultaneously, the project aims to increase the critical mass of the research centres, improve the quality of the publications, promote the mobility of researchers and optimise the specific resources and infrastructure of each of the participating entities.

The University of Huelva (UHU) coordinates this project in which also participate CTAQUA, IFAPA Centro El Toruño, the University of Córdoba and the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) from the Spanish side. Portugal is represented by the University of the Algarve (UAlg), Necton, the Portuguese Institute for the Sea and the Atmosphere (IPMA) and Sea4US.

As two companies take part in this project, a good transfer of the results to the private sector is expected in order to increase their innovative potential, strengthen the microalgae biotechnology business sector and also promote the creation of positions for qualified personnel.

Planned project activities include the bioprospection and setting up of a trans-national collection of new strains of fast-growing microalgae; and the valorisation of microalgal biomass for the development of innovative bio-products in the fields of biomedicine and cosmetics.

Likewise, it will also be sought the increase of knowledge of key metabolical routes, implicated in nutrient assimilation, bio-energy production and synthesis of significant compounds by microalgae. The project will last two and a half years and will end in December 2019.


Visit the ctaqua website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

14/07/2017: Feeds for easy and efficient production of nutritionally optimised rotifers

by Eric Henry, Ph.D. Research Scientist, Reed Mariculture Inc.

Rotifers remain the most widely-used live feed for early stages of larval fish culture, and hatchery success is critically dependent on a reliable supply of healthy, nutritionally-enriched rotifers that can provide the nutrition larvae need to support rapid growth and normal development. 


Micrograph of Reed Mariculture’s RotiGrow®
Plus microalgae concentrate
Image credit: Reed Mariculture

“They are what they eat” 
The nutritional value of rotifers depends entirely on the feeds used to produce them. Typically, batch cultures are grown to harvest density using low-cost feeds based on yeast or algae that are easily produced but of limited nutritional value, such as Spirulina, Chlorella, or Nannochloropsis.
 
Some of these feeds are available as dry powders, which can be shipped at a low cost and stored at room temperature. But dry feeds can be laborious to properly re-hydrate and dispense to rotifer cultures, and if the powders are not completely dispersed as un-clumped particles less than 20 micrometers in diameter they cannot be ingested by the rotifers.

Uneaten feed is not only wasted, but will foul cultures and promote blooms of bacteria and ciliate protozoa that are present in many rotifer culture systems. Dry feed particles are also subject to rapid leaching of soluble nutritional components before they can be consumed by the rotifers.

“Too Much and Too Late”

When such batch cultures have grown to the required density, the feed must then be switched to a lipid-emulsion “enrichment” feed for a few hours before the rotifers can be fed to larvae, in an effort to compensate for the poor nutritional quality of the grow-out feed.

This “gut loading” strategy fills the digestive tracts of the rotifers with the lipid-rich feed, to be delivered to the larvae when the rotifers are consumed. But this conventional enrichment practice can be described as “too much and too late.”

Too much, because the extreme lipid content of conventional enrichment feeds is nutritionally unbalanced and is quite stressful to the rotifers, as evidenced by the dramatic rise in oxygen consumption of rotifers during enrichment feeding. Too late, because enrichment feeding at the end of the culture cycle is so brief that only the gut contents of the rotifer are enriched, while the rest of the body of the rotifer is unchanged.

Active, clean, healthy rotifers are essential for production of the healthiest larvae, but the stress caused by the extreme lipid content of conventional enrichment feeds weakens the rotifers and reduces their motility.

Lipid emulsions foul the rotifer enrichment tank as well as the rotifers, so some of the enrichment feed is not consumed by the rotifers and is therefore wasted. The emulsion-fouled rotifers then must undergo stressful harvesting and washing procedures before they can be fed to larvae.

They suffer additional stress when the popular “cold bank” technique is used (storing rotifers at refrigerator temperature and feeding out to larvae over 18-24 hours). Temperature shocks when enriched rotifers are cold banked, and again when they are transferred to the larval tank, can cause the rotifers to eject their gut contents (and enrichment), fouling the cold storage or larval tank, reducing the nutritional value of the rotifers, and further weakening or killing many before they are fed to larvae.

Finally, once the rotifers are transferred to the larval tank, the enriched gut contents diminish as they are used to support rotifer metabolism, or they may be lost as poorly digested feces when transport through the gut accelerates as the rotifers consume “greenwater” algae.


Read the full article, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

IDAH company profile



IDAH’s ultimate goal is to be world’s number one with customer satisfaction.
IDAH’s vision is to build on our solid traditional manufacturing roots and expand out to be a full-service solutions provider: offering value-added system designs and turnkey project consultation services.

Through this expansion, we hope to create an international platform where technology could be shared and integrated for the benefit of our customers.

By upholding the IDAH Spirit, the passionate team members of IDAH are committed to achieve this vision.

The IDAH Spirit
"Creativity, Honesty & Quality "

Creativity is what gave birth to IDAH in 1974 and consequently the birth of the feeds manufacturing industry in Asia.

Innovation through creativity is what has enabled us to be the industry driver from our inception until now. IDAH is committed and well positioned to lead the industry of tomorrow.

If creativity is the engine that has rapidly pushed IDAH forward; Honesty is what keeps us moving in the right direction.

 IDAH has been firmly grounded on the virtues of quality, honour, and accountability. Our main business is to safeguard the trust that customers have given us and be a dedicated upholder of the highest quality standard.

Visit the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

13/07/2017: AquaBounty acquires fish farming facility in Indiana, USA

AquaBounty Technologies, Inc. (NASDAQ: AQB), a biotechnology company focused on enhancing productivity in the aquaculture market and a majority-owned subsidiary of Intrexon Corporation (NYSE: XON), announces that it has entered into an agreement to purchase certain assets of Bell Fish Company, including its farming facility in Albany, Indiana, for $14 million in cash

 
Salmon
Image credit: Julia Manzerova on Flickr
Ronald Stotish, Chief Executive Officer of AquaBounty, stated, "This acquisition marks an important milestone and provides the Company with its first commercial-scale facility in the United States for growing eco-friendly AquAdvantage® Salmon. This site will enable production of healthy Atlantic salmon, which will not require vaccines or antibiotics, in a sustainable and responsible manner close to domestic consumers."

The purchase, which is expected to close within the next 30 days, will provide the Company with a land-based, contained aquaculture system to grow AquAdvantage Salmon near major demand centres in the $2 billion US Atlantic salmon market.

The United States currently imports over 92 percent of the farmed Atlantic salmon it consumes.

AquAdvantage Salmon will offer the opportunity for a viable domestic aquaculture industry while providing consumers a fresh and delicious product. If anticipated timelines are achieved, the facility's first harvest could come as soon as the third quarter of 2019. This is significantly faster than other land-based facilities due to the quicker time to market for AquAdvantage Salmon.

Once fully operational, the current facility will have an expected annual capacity of 1200 metric tons, which at current Atlantic salmon prices represents over $10 million a year in potential sales, with the possibility for future expansion. AquaBounty continues to evaluate additional opportunities for larger production facilities in both the United States and Canada.


Visit the Aquabounty website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

13/07/2017: A protein for our future: Empyreal® 75 'Made of fire and a world apart’

by Roger Gilbert, Publisher, International Aquafeed

International Aquafeed magazine was invited to tour the production facility for a unique aquaculture protein product, at the remarkable Cargill production plant in Blair, Nebraska, USA
 

What is in a name?
Take Empyreal® for example. Was it introduced into our consciousness simply to brand a new product coming onto the market and required a catchy new name? No, there appears to be more to it than that, a lot more to it.

‘Empyreal’ carries the meaning, in both Greek and Latin, ‘of the highest heaven’ or ‘the celestial, sublime or exalted.’ It is ‘of the sky’ or ‘of the heaven’ and is ‘made of pure fire’!

An impressive meaning to be given to a product in our industry!

But can any product live up to such formidable claims or association, you may ask? Surprisingly, we at International Aquafeed and our sister publication Milling and Grain, think it can and will. The product is a revolutionary vegetable protein. Protein is the building block of human civilization itself.

Without protein and the right kind of proteins in their amino acid profiles, we would not have achieved our current intelligence nor status within our small galaxy, nor can we can be expect to maintain that position over time without increasing the supply of the highest-quality proteins for our domesticated livestock and fish production and in turn ourselves.

Empyreal® 75 carries the meaning behind the word, and is the brand name for this ‘new’ protein product that is at last being produced in volume, efficiently and economically and is finding growing demand within the global aquafeed processing industry and is creating demand and application in intensive livestock production systems.

As it says on the label, this product has a 75 percent, highly digestive protein content with an attractive amino acid profile that is made from that humble maize or corn kernel that in its natural stage contains just eight percent protein. Producing a concentrated protein from maize or a corn-gluten meal is not new, but never at the concentration above 75 percent that is being achieved today.

The technology behind the processing - “Is staggering”
Milling and Grain and International Aquafeed magazines were given a unique opportunity to tour the production facility manufacturing this unique product at the massive Cargill production plant in Blair, Nebraska, USA; which is located right at the western edge of the corn belt and is adjacent to the Union-Pacific Railroad, the Missouri River and US Highway 30.

From across the valley the plant could be mistaken for a traditional chemical plant and consisting of silver silos, glinting pipework and masses of stainless-steel buildings. There is a regular convoy of trucks entering and leaving the site.

Cargill’s Blair plant is sited on 250ha in an attractive, farming environment with hardly another building in sight. We were hosted around the plant, referred to as a ‘campus’, by the company’s Product Line team headed by Jered Anderson, who has overall responsibility for the production of ‘Empyreal 75’.

Included in our group were Claudio Paredes, global aquaculture sales director, Michael Klapperich, director of sales in North America and responsible for Empyreal product distribution and Eric Bell, AVP product line manager from Cargill Starches and Sweeteners North America.

‘Empyreal 75’ is a primary product from this plant with additional products produced by a number of independent and joint-venture companies operating from the ‘campus’ site, and utilising the infrastructure and the various products of the corn milling process. Plant construction started in 1992 and started grinding corn in 1995.

With over a billion dollars invested in this site so far, it is one of Cargill's largest investments, which has had various expansions over the past 20 years. Each day the plant consumes thousands of tonnes of corn to manufacture various products.

It operates 24-hours per day for 365 days a year. It employs 550 permanent staff and almost 400 on-site contractors. It has a dedicated team of pipe fitters, electricians and mechanics and other services contracted to maintain production and resolve issues should they arise.


Read the full article, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Extru-Tech Inc company profile


Founded in 1985, Extru-Tech® has installed numerous extrusion systems worldwide designed for the production of human food, pet food, aquatic feed and animal feed products.

Extru-Tech® also maintains the reputation of supplying the extrusion industry with superior quality replacement parts.


Extru-Tech® currently produces and markets one of the industry's most complete lines of extrusion processing systems. 

In addition, they offer a full line of ancillary equipment and customised equipment solutions for specialised processes.

Visit the website HERE


The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

12/07/2017: Here comes Costa Rica

by Antonio Garza de Ph.D., University of Technology of the Sea of Tamaulipas Bicentennial, Mexico

In recent days I had the great honour of giving the inaugural class for the first generation of the Baccalaureate in Aquaculture of the National Technical University (UTN) in Costa Rica


 
Dr Antonio Garza de Yta
The intention was that from my perspective could motivate the new students to continue for this beautiful world of aquaculture. Actually, I think the experience was more inspiration for me, the server. My visit to Puntarenas filled my soul, since I can see young people wanting to succeed in life, with that passion in their eyes, with that easy smile, with that security when walking that only belongs to the youth, but recharges the batteries of anybody.

During this visit, I was able to get to know the new and impeccable facilities that UTN has and spend time with my good friend Don Guillermo Hurtado, who, along with Nelson Acosta, Director of the Latin American and Caribbean Chapter of the World Society of Acuaculture (LACC-WAS) got to work and after many years of vision and effort they managed to consolidate this new educational offer that is now a reality.

I am sure that with the professionalism and dedication of all the team in charge and with the human material stadium that is now established, Costa Rican aquaculture can feel safer than ever to advance to the ambitious pace that has been raised recently.

More great news in Costa Rica is a part of the LACC-WAS, the largest conglomerate in LACQUA, organised by San Miguel de San José in 2019. It is an example of a link, which is in fact LACQUA and its centrally located seats. I thank the Rector, Marcelo Prieto and the.

Francisco Romero, Vice-Rector of Research not only the great host, but the vision that both have had to support this event, which will surely be a watershed for Costa Rican aquaculture; Besides an unforgettable experience for all its students.

Changing the topic a little, you know that in this column I always try to have an objective view and get away from political issues. Recent events in our most northern country cannot be overlooked and we need to at least give our attention to them.


Read the full article, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Bühler company profile




There are plenty of good reasons for Bühler’s success: Personal commitment, clever entrepreneurial decision-making, a high level of sensitivity to the changing needs of the market, and a core business that has become a byword for quality and consistency, founded on the distinct power to innovate.

Tackling the challenges of the period and of the market have always played a role in shaping the direction of the company. This is simply something that Buhler has always done, and when it comes to generating benefits and added value for our customers, we have always been a step ahead.

Bühler is a specialist and technology partner for plant and equipment and related services for processing basic foods and manufacturing high-grade materials. The Group is a global market leader in the supply of flour production plants, pasta and chocolate production lines, fish and animal feed manufacturing installations, and aluminium die casting systems.

The core technologies of the Group are in the field of mechanical and thermal process engineering. With its expertise and over 150 years of experience, Bühler time and again rolls out unique and innovative solutions for its customers, helping them achieve success in the marketplace.

Over the decades Bühler has come to be acknowledged as a reliable partner thanks to its distinct commitment to quality and its global presence.

Bühler Group operates in over 140 countries, has a global payroll of 7860, and generated sales revenues of CHF1907 million in fiscal 2010.


Visit the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

12/07/2017: State-of-the-art aquaculture technology to be showcased at Aquaculture Taiwan Expo

Aquaculture Taiwan Expo & Forum (Aquaculture Taiwan) will be held from 28th-30th September, 2017 at Taipei Nangang Exhibition Centre

This will be the first exhibition in Taiwan focused solely on innovative, eco-friendly, sustainable aquaculture technologies, which will be organised by UBM Asia Ltd., Taiwan branch and officially co-organised by Council of Agriculture of Taiwan Government. 


 
Bioreactor presented by a Canadian
exhibitor can be used for aquaculture
and biotech industry
Image credit: Aquaculture Taiwan
Aquaculture Taiwan will welcome international brands from over 16 countries to showcase state-of-the-art aquaculture technologies, disease and cure screening equipment and test kits, water quality control measurements, feed and feed additive products and formula, automatic aquaculture equipment, smart aquaculture system and platform, seafood processing equipment, seafood, and many more.

An exhibitor from Canada will debut their professional bioreactors for aquaculture and biotech industry. The bioreactor is used to produce bio secure algae and rotifers on-site at aquaculture hatcheries. It can also be used to produce omega-3 oils and antioxidants in biotech. This bioreactor is fully automated, touchscreen controlled and self-cleaning.

Another exhibitor will display their professional full line of water testing instruments including pH, ORP, Temp., RH, DO, TDS, Conductivity, Turbidity and Chlorine. 90 percent of their products are exported to all over the world. Companies, such as Extech, Omega, Cole-Parmer, ATP, RS, ABB, etc., have been loyal customers with them for a long time. 


 
Water quality control testing kit
brought by an exhibitor of
Aquaculture Taiwan
Image credit: Aquaculture Taiwan
Other than advanced technologies and smart equipment, series of thematic conferences given by top-notch speakers focus on “Asian aquaculture overview,” “How to utilise 21st century know-hows on traditional aquaculture industry,” etc., will also be laid out at the Expo. 



















Visit the Aquaculture Taiwan website,  HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news